Home Innovations Liveaboards adopt Tracking System

Liveaboards adopt Tracking System

In the Red Sea more and more Liveaboards are taking safety very seriously and protecting their guests with the latest high-tec device.

When the ENOS® system was launched the Egyptian authorities gave almost immediate approval for its use by dive boats in the Red Sea. This is a device that substantially increases diver safety, especially while diving in remote locations. In the event that divers become separated from their boat, this device makes it possible tolocate them very quickly and initiate a speedy rescue.

It consists of two units, bothsupported by GPS: a receiver onboard the dive boat and transmitters, which are carried by every diver during the dive. If divers surface and realise they are a long way from the boat they activate their transmitters. Only 15 seconds later the crew on board gets the first alert to prompt them to look for the divers. If the divers are visible to the crew, the rescue operation can start immediately. If not there is only a short delay before the ENOS® receiver on board displays the precise location of the divers, including distance and heading, as an easily understandable graph on its screen.

Liveaboards in the Red Sea were the first in the world to take up this new technology. A number of Red Sea boats have already taken this new technology on board and its use here is spreading giving our diving guests more peace of mind.

Where the Red Sea leads others follow and ENOS® is now in use in many top diving destinations including the Maldives, Australia, the Galapagos and Ecuador.

It’s just a thought but if it had been available earlier perhaps the events depicted in the movie Open Water might never have happened!

 

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